Regina Hoer Photography Blog

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Lanyon Quoit on Flickr.Lanyon Quoit - Cornwall 
© Regina Hoer
Lanyon Quoit is a dolmen in Cornwall, dating from the Neolithic period (3500-2500BC). Originally the quoit stood atop four upright stone columns and was tall enough for a horse and rider to pass beneath, but it crashed to the ground during a storm in 1815. Re-erected 9 years later, it now stands only a little over a metre tall and on three remaining stone columns. Nevertheless the Lanyon Quoit looks still very impressive.

Lanyon Quoit on Flickr.

Lanyon Quoit - Cornwall
© Regina Hoer

Lanyon Quoit is a dolmen in Cornwall, dating from the Neolithic period (3500-2500BC). Originally the quoit stood atop four upright stone columns and was tall enough for a horse and rider to pass beneath, but it crashed to the ground during a storm in 1815. Re-erected 9 years later, it now stands only a little over a metre tall and on three remaining stone columns. Nevertheless the Lanyon Quoit looks still very impressive.

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Lanyon Quoit - one of the best known dolmen in Cornwall on Flickr.Lanyon Quoit - one of the best known dolmen in Cornwall.
© Regina Hoer
Lanyon Quoit is a dolmen in Cornwall, dating from the Neolithic period (3500-2500BC). Originally the quoit stood atop four upright stone columns and was tall enough for a horse and rider to pass beneath, but it crashed to the ground during a storm in 1815. Re-erected 9 years later, it now stands only a little over a metre tall and on three remaining stone columns. Nevertheless the Lanyon Quoit looks still very impressive.

Lanyon Quoit - one of the best known dolmen in Cornwall on Flickr.

Lanyon Quoit - one of the best known dolmen in Cornwall.
© Regina Hoer

Lanyon Quoit is a dolmen in Cornwall, dating from the Neolithic period (3500-2500BC). Originally the quoit stood atop four upright stone columns and was tall enough for a horse and rider to pass beneath, but it crashed to the ground during a storm in 1815. Re-erected 9 years later, it now stands only a little over a metre tall and on three remaining stone columns. Nevertheless the Lanyon Quoit looks still very impressive.

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King Doniert’s Stone on Bodmin Moor on Flickr.King Doniert’s Stone on Bodmin Moor.  
© Regina Hoer
King Doniert’s Stone consists of two pieces of a rich decorated 9th century Celtic cross. The inscription is believed to commemorate Dungarth, King of Cornwall who died around 875.

King Doniert’s Stone on Bodmin Moor on Flickr.

King Doniert’s Stone on Bodmin Moor.

© Regina Hoer

King Doniert’s Stone consists of two pieces of a rich decorated 9th century Celtic cross. The inscription is believed to commemorate Dungarth, King of Cornwall who died around 875.

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Medieval Cross “Long Tom” on Bodmin Moor on Flickr.Medieval Cross “Long Tom” on Bodmin Moor 
Probably the Longstone or Long Tom is a christianised prehistoric standing stone like many Celtic crosses around Cornwall.
© Regina Hoer

Medieval Cross “Long Tom” on Bodmin Moor on Flickr.

Medieval Cross “Long Tom” on Bodmin Moor

Probably the Longstone or Long Tom is a christianised prehistoric standing stone like many Celtic crosses around Cornwall.

© Regina Hoer

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Cornish Mining Engine House Ruin on Flickr.Cornish Mining Engine House Ruin 
near The Hurlers Stone Circles 
© Regina Hoer

Cornish Mining Engine House Ruin on Flickr.

Cornish Mining Engine House Ruin
near The Hurlers Stone Circles
© Regina Hoer

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The Hurlers Stone Circles on Flickr.The Hurlers Stone Circles   
© Regina Hoer 
The Hurlers is a group of three stone circles in Cornwall, England, on the eastern flank of Bodmin Moor. 
A legend tells, that men were magically transformed into stones as punishment for playing ‘hurling’ on a Sunday.

The Hurlers Stone Circles on Flickr.

The Hurlers Stone Circles
© Regina Hoer
The Hurlers is a group of three stone circles in Cornwall, England, on the eastern flank of Bodmin Moor.
A legend tells, that men were magically transformed into stones as punishment for playing ‘hurling’ on a Sunday.

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